Smith Westerns

The Crocodile Presents

Smith Westerns

Wampire, The Hoot Hoots

Fri, August 16, 2013

8:00 pm

The Crocodile

Seattle, WA

$13 Adv.

This event is all ages

Smith Westerns
Smith Westerns
In the four itinerant years since their self-titled debut, Smith Westerns have grown unphased by the rigors of touring. The melodic indie-rock group—whose latest album, Soft Will, drops June 25—has tested its mettle (and passed) with pivotal opening slots for MGMT and Wilco, not to mention high-profile stints in front of the itchy, overbaked masses at Coachella and Lollapalooza. Yet, come February 2012, after finishing up a whopping 140 dates to promote their second album (the critically hailed Dye It Blonde), Smith Westerns were apprehensive about returning home to headline a gig in their native Chicago.

When Smith Westerns finally arrived home, friends they looked forward to seeing had moved, and clubs they once frequented had disappeared. All the while, on the road, singer-guitarist Cullen Omori, bassist-brother Cameron Omori, and guitarist Max Kakacek had grown from—as they say in music parlance—boys to men. Everything, now, was ominously different.

This intersection between success and post-tour unrest culminates in the band’s third full-length, Soft Will, produced by Chris Coady (Beach House, Yeah Yeah Yeahs) and the first to feature new drummer Julien Ehrlich, formerly of Unknown Mortal Orchestra. It starts with “3am Spiritual,” the album’s dreamy opener. “You’re creating your own future,” says Cullen, “and lot of the ideas on the record were reactive. For a long time, you’re playing music every night where you’re bringing the party. And you go from having something to do every day to…nothing.”

Bummed out, he penned the song during the spring of 2012 on a mini-keyboard in the most mundane of places: his parent’s kitchen. “The lyrics came right away. It was supposed to be this uplifting ballad, to make myself feel better,” Cullen says. The song likewise marked a turning point for the group.“We decided to challenge ourselves with making songs that we hadn’t really done before,” explains Max. “With ‘3am Spiritual’ we didn’t want it to be as immediately poppy. It was more a progression of ideas, designed to build up to a big chorus.”

There’s a cool metamorphosis that pervades Soft Will. For instance, its first single, the shimmering, lovesick “Varsity,” actually began as an acoustic track that doubles as a tongue-and-cheek reference to being referred to as a high-school band by the press. “Then in the studio, it just came out as a mid-tempo pop song.” Max notes, adding, “There was an improvisation to some songs, that lead to them being catchier.”

They recorded the meat of Soft Will at Sonic Ranch, a live-in recording studio located 30 minutes outside of El Paso, Texas and a stone’s throw from the Mexican border. “It was like going to summer camp,” Cullen offers. They loved the isolation. “We pretty much stayed on the ranch and cranked them out,” says Cameron.

Soft Will, in kind, is an album of frontiers: mellifluous guitars, confident restraint, and pensive songwriting. But to Smith Westerns, recording an album about dreading their homestead feels almost like an interlude—because they can’t wait to play those songs on the road. “Sitting around doing nothing for a while,” admits Cameron, “it can be nerve-wracking.”
Wampire
Wampire
In 2007, longtime best friends Rocky Tinder and Eric Phipps moved to Portland, Oregon and decided to start a band. With all the buoyancy and idealism of youth (being fresh out of high school at the time), and stimulated by the massive amount of creative output surrounding them in their new city, they sketched out a vision for a massive friend band - the possibility of getting every single one of their buds on stage and creating a monumental live show. Yet both boys have discerning taste, having backgrounds in music theory from a tender age, and questioned the logistics of a chaotic set-up. Moreover, they were enamored of the freedom that local dance music outfits had with their compact set-ups, allowing these acts to show up and throw down anywhere. Accordingly, they tweaked their vision and decided to just do it themselves. Armed with two guitars and an iPod filled with their meticulously prerecorded beats, bass lines, and bells, they became Wampire – two boys on a mission to have as much fun being a dance-rock duo as 20 people combined. Now, 3 years later, with the new addition of drummer Cyrus Lampton for extra beats and extra smiles, it is very safe to say that Wampire have succeeded: this band is epically, epically fun. Whether rocking out in the dark of a nightclub, with Flashdance projected behind them from out of Tinder's gold-painted VCR, or stripping down to their skivvies during an afternoon parking lot performance, Wampire is a sight to behold. They're certainly not taking themselves too seriously, but one can say a lot more than that about their live show. Their easy chemistry and inexhaustible joviality is totally infectious – you're powerless to resist the dance floor when they take the stage.
The Hoot Hoots
The Hoot Hoots
Seattle power pop quartet The Hoot Hoots are irresistible party starters. Their songs are powered by fuzzy guitars, fuzzier keyboards, and headhum-inducing hooks, and all these combine in a glorious, slightly insane energy in both their live shows and in their nearest EP, Feel the Cosmos.

Lead vocalist/guitarist Adam Prairie grew up with his brother/drummer Chris in the middle of Midwestern corn fields in Clifton, IL. The two played whiffle ball and Nintendo, watched the original Star Wars trilogy obsessively, and learned to play guitars, drums, and Casio keyboards in the bedroom they shared for most of their formative years.

Since then they've rounded out their sound with bassist Geoff Brown and keyboardist Christina Ellis, and they've released two albums, and their latest EP Feel the Cosmos was named Seattle Metropolitan Magazine's album of the month. Seattle radio station KEXP named the lead track Go For A Walk song of the day for Jan. 18 2012, and said, "Even now in the band’s early stages, we are seeing some seriously promising omens of success from the Hoot Hoots, and their newest release, Feel The Cosmos, is of course no exception."

They are currently working on their third studio album, which has a tentative release date of Fall 2014.
Venue Information:
The Crocodile
2200 2nd Ave
Seattle, WA, 98121
http://thecrocodile.com/index.html