The Holdup X Carter Reeves @ The Timbre Room

The Crocodile Presents:

The Holdup X Carter Reeves @ The Timbre Room

Thu, February 22, 2018

7:30 pm

The Timbre Room

Seattle, WA

$14 Adv.

This event is 21 and over

The Holdup
The Holdup
The Holdup is a California based Reggae band with heavy influences in the genres of R&B and Hip Hop. Since releasing their debut album, Stay Gold, the band has garnered a great deal of commercial success and moved on to sell tens of thousands of records nationwide. Stay Gold debuted at #1 on the iTunes Reggae charts and the single “Good Times” was on rotation at a large number of radio stations across San Francisco and the greater Bay Area. Every album from The Holdup since then has found the band reaching a new milestone. From 2010’s Confidence leading the band to receive iTunes’ Best New Reggae Artist of 2010 award, to 2011’s Still Gold peaking at #2 on the Billboard reggae chart. Their heavy urban appeal has even led to features on Mac Miller’s “MostDope” blog and 2 Chainz’ “Most Expensivest Shit” video series presented by GQ. The band’s latest release, Leaves In The Pool was met with heavy acclaim and debuted at #1 on Billboard’s Reggae chart. Following the release, The Holdup have found themselves touring more in 2017 than ever before and continue to hit the road while putting out singles that challenge you to find a better song in their discography.

The band first began performing their songs at local venues around San Jose and a fan base quickly developed for their catchy multi-genre delivery. The success of their live show and the growing popularity around radio play found them performing and touring with a number of amazing artists. From Reggae mainstays like Collie Buddz and Steel Pulse, to the more mainstream side of things with Rebelution, Dirty Heads and Iration. They’ve even shared stages with the likes of 2 Chainz and Rae Sremmurd.
Carter Reeves
Carter Reeves
Carter Reeves has a spring in his step. Maybe it’s that he’s fresh off a six-year stint selling out shows across the world as half of alt hip-hop duo Aer. Or maybe it’s that his good-mood vibe is exactly what gives his particular brand of pop such an addictive bounce.

“The thing I kept asking myself was ‘what does this make me feel?” he says. “I’d rather people be having fun, that feels more impactful than having people listen to my music and cry.”

Those feel-good sounds are exactly what Reeves delivers in his debut single, Fresh Fruit. The track is sunny but not sugary, a smile in your ear, perfect for grooving out the car window as you drive along the beach. Reeves says he sees music as colors, and Fresh Fruit is all in a Miami palette: yellows, oranges, pinks.

The name comes from Carter’s favorite snacks (“kiwi’s always held it down, but I’m slowly getting into dragonfruit”) but the forthcoming EP are about an artist coming into his own, ripening into a new phase of his career with music that is both tart and sweet.

Reeves says the good mood vibes fuel his creation. As he played around with the first chords of “Fresh Fruit,” he thought to himself, “this is bright, this is happy, this makes me feel like I’m walking out of my house with a pair of new shoes on.” And so the first line of the song (“It’s got me feeling like new shoes,”) comes from that feeling. It’s like a bottled happiness that feeds on itself.

That’s the mood he wants to give to others. Reeves says that over the course of his six years with his old band Aer, he experienced a profound shift in his conception of what music means both to him and to his fans. “It became a job, and then it became a gift,” he said. That gift is the simplest one of all: making other people feel good.

Reeves has always thought of music more as a mood-lifter than as a competitive discipline. Raised in Massachusetts, he grew up singing along to Hall & Oates and Fleetwood Mac with his parents, jamming to the car radio and sifting through old CDs and records. His parents encouraged him to take piano lessons— but he quit. They urged him to join the school chorus, instead, Reeves began playing around with some high school friends, and they started a band. They began to play a few gigs, and then a few more. And out of that small high school group, Aer was born.

Reeves started touring with Aer straight out of high school, which means he’s lived on his own for longer than most other 23-year olds. The pressures of doing his own laundry and paying his own bills are routine by now, and behind the youthful falsetto and hipster man-bun is an old soul. To Reeves, feeling good doesn’t necessarily mean partying till dawn. He often spends his Friday nights finishing whatever nonfiction book he’s been reading lately, although he's just off a Murakami kick.

This maturity makes him confident in what his music can do— and what it can’t. It takes a truly wise young person to recognize how much he hasn’t experienced yet, and to his credit, Reeves isn’t trying to pretend like he’s endured more pain than he has. “I don’t want to narrate people’s problems if I haven't been through them myself,” he says. “I’d prefer to be the means to forgetting about those problems.”

He offers oblivion, not catharsis. “I’m having fun making it, and I want people to have fun listening to it,” he says. “That’s what I want to give to people: a brief moment of forgetting.” As he toured the country with Aer, fans kept coming up to him to tell him how much their music had helped them through dark times. Reeves realized that music that helps people escape their problems is just as important as music that helps people understand themselves better.
Venue Information:
The Timbre Room
1809 Minor Ave.
Seattle, WA, 98101
http://www.timbreroom.com