Mansionair

The Crocodile Presents:

Mansionair

Beacon

Thu, March 7, 2019

8:00 pm

The Crocodile

Seattle, WA

$15 Adv.

This event is all ages

Mansionair
Mansionair
Sydney-based trio Mansionair made their debut with breakout hit 'Hold Me Down' which made radio waves from the clubs of Australia, over to Paris and across the ocean to Brooklyn. It all began in 2014 when singer Jack Froggatt, who had been playing the local music scene, accepted an invitation to top-line a suite of production beats by producer/guitarist Lachlan Bostock and drummer/producer Alex Nicholls. "Hold Me Down," a mélange of ethereal falsetto and ambient-synth-pop, hit one million views in just two months, brought together the individual talents of each musician and solidified the formation of the three-piece band now known as Mansionair.

Soon after, the band signed to Glassnote Records and were handpicked by genre-bending trio CHVRCHES to open on their headline tour across the USA, UK, and Europe. Mansionair went on to join Alt-J and Florence & The Machine on the road, most recently wrapping up a tour with London Grammar.

At the tail end of 2016, Mansionair released bristling track 'Easier,' which has now reached over 12 million streams, a testament to the fan-base they've created in such a short period of time. While working on their latest offering, the band collaborated with Seattle duo Odesza on their lead single 'Line Of Sight,' which has since climbed Billboard's Alternative and Dance/Electronic charts and has amassed millions of streams.

Their expansive almost cinematic textured production meld Froggatt's intimate, honest lyrics. Stories of longing, hope and letting go meet careening sing-a-long choruses and smooth downtempo ballads, held by Bostock's sleek production and Nicholl's beats. Their collaboration is equal and assured.

Now, their breakout turn for the group, 'Astronaut (Something About Your Love)' is a genre-splitting shot from the soul; as playful as it is a sincere exploration of loneliness and distant affections. The song starts with a suite of otherworldly harmonics, "We shoved a microphone deep inside a piano and recorded all the atmospheric noises that came out," Bostock tells. "Like what I imagined an astronaut felt as if he was looking back at Earth."

It's the juxtaposition between Froggatt's intimate vocal delivery and the geographic stretch of Mansionair's production that makes them so intriguing. Another way to view their compositions might be as micro explorations of the grand internal; miniatures writ large. "I love that stream-of-conscious style of songwriting," Froggatt says. "As though you're sitting in the back of a party on a couch and you're just in your own head, overthinking everything."

Nicholls; rhythms bridge both live and programmed percussion: danceable and unpredictable, his beats draw the listener inward rather than blast out. Bostock describes the group's writing and production style (for the most part, done all on their own) as one in which each member is responsible for his instrument but all have a voice in the whole. "We see each of us a dimension in the band. We're three equal parts," Bostock says.

Not only have Bostock, Nicholls and Froggatt expanded their early chemistry into a self-sufficient writing and recording project, but theirs is also a partnership philosophically built on synergy. "We've grown up through this band and we've seen a lot already," Froggatt explains. "I want people who listen to us to know that even though life can throw punches, you can push back through anything and come out the other side."
Beacon
Beacon
Thomas Mullarney and Jacob Gossett, aka Brooklyn duo Beacon, introduced themselves to the world with the No Body and For Now EPs, both released last year on Ghostly International. The EPs were united by minimalist, R&B-influenced instrumentation, and also by a lyrical theme, with both serving as meditations on the darkness that underpins the most intense of human emotions: love.
The duo's debut album The Ways We Separate both consolidates and develops these ideas. The album focuses, as the title suggests, on the idea of separation — both within the context of relationships and in a more intimate, psychological sense. As Mullarney explains, "The narrative contained inside The Ways We Separate deals with two kinds of separation: one where two entities grow apart, and the other where we grow apart from ourselves. Over the course of a relationship, the two sometimes happen together, one being the result of the other."

Desires, passions and regrets are central to the songs on The Ways We Separate, which take a variety of perspectives to construct a nuanced reflection on the album's central theme. 'Between the Waves' draws a clever analogy between relationships and soundwaves falling out of phase: "I know all the ways we separate/ Where we start to fade at different frequencies." 'Overseer' catalogues a parting of the ways with discomfiting clarity: "Isn't it fine?/ Taking it slow?/ Watching you watch me walk out your door." And album closer 'Split in Two' explores how th extremes of love and loss can take you far away from being the person you thought you were, making explicit the connection between the two ideas of separation: "What I'd do for you?", sings Thomas Mullarney, "Split myself in half/ Divided into two."

Musically, The Ways We Separate finds Beacon working with a richer sonic palette than ever before —as Gossett says, "The production on this album is much more expansive than anything we've done thus far. We spent a lot of time exploring new gear and experimenting with how to pull a wide range of sound out of various instruments. Some of the key sonics that shaped this LP are analogue synthesis, lots of heavily processed guitar work, and vocal layering/processing." While the abiding mood remains that of late-night introspection, the production draws from elements of hip hop and a wide gamut of electronic music, marrying intricate beats and subtle textures to honeyed pop melodies that belie the album's conceptual depth. Rarely has bleakness sounded so pretty — this is a record that's deceptively, compellingly beautiful, an exploration of a place both discomfiting and darkly seductive.
Venue Information:
The Crocodile
2200 2nd Ave
Seattle, WA, 98121
http://www.thecrocodile.com/