Generationals

The Crocodile Presents:

Generationals

Springtime Carnivore, Kairos

Sat, November 15, 2014

8:00 pm

The Crocodile

Seattle, WA

$13 Adv.

This event is all ages

Generationals
Generationals
Ted Joyner and Grant Widmer, friends since high school and Generationals co-captains since 2008, have been in each others' faces for most of this century. Natural songwriting partners, they made their first three records at home with the help of mutual friend Daniel Black, and in 2013 they launched straight into their fourth with surprising post-tour energy, but after years of creative brain-melding, the dyad had reached a point of ultra-familiarity and comfort in their work routine that, to them, threatened quicksand. They began to suspect their own productivity of being rut in disguise.
Determined to keep things fresh, they sought out a new producer who might be able shake things up, surprise them, and bring something new to the project. How about Richard Swift? they said. He's the best, he's the boss, he's like the John Keating of cool drum sounds—a perfect fit for a pair of poppy throwback tape-lovers like us.
The Louisiana duo made their way, yellow brick road-style, to Cottage Grove, Oregon, ready to give their tapes over to Swift's cultishly venerated magic touch, but the collaboration was hardly the scrap-it-all, start-from-scratch, give-up-the-reins-and-let-the-guru-do-his-thing scenario Ted and Grant had expected—hoped for even—when they began their pilgrimage to Swift's National Freedom studio in February. Swift deemed the demos album-worthy after all and the original versions were saved at his urging. With a little tightening rather than a vibe transplant, the songs solidified into a cohesive, finished, good-feeling record.
"I looked at the demos objectively and really just helped organize the sounds into something that was sonically cohesive," Swift said. "I knew they spent a lot of time on their own, on their headphones creating these beats and bells and whistles and felt no need to drastically change them."
The final version of Alix materialized as perhaps Generationals' most confident record yet, full of history and as multiphase as Ted and Grant's friendship. Built up with layer upon layer of rhythmic lines, computer noises, RZA beats, and poppy vocals that sometimes sound like a Janet Jackson/Prince face-off, Alix is everything T&G like about music: old and new, vinyl and youtube, vocal chord and microkorg, gathered up from everywhen and arranged with great care into a good-smelling, subtly sexy, catchy-or-die mish-mosh of sensibilities and time-warp senselessness, lightly peppered with that signature Swiftian element, but undeniably Generationals in taste. As Swift had decreed: 'tis a good idea to tear down and rebuild, but it's not always necessary to start from scratch.
Springtime Carnivore
Springtime Carnivore
"Springtime Carnivore was born on the night of a full moon in the summer of the year of the dragon. She is the seventh of twelve siblings. Her father was a painter and her mother baked wedding cakes. Her favorite color is turquoise. Her favorite food is purple Pez. In a past life she slept beneath the stars in far away Western places and died in a gun fight with Annie Oakley.

Following high school, Springtime Carnivore joined a traveling circus company. She was a talented and nimble acrobat but her career was cut short by a tragic tightrope accident. "We had been traveling for days trying to maintain our schedule and we were all sick and tired and lonesome," she recently wrote in a letter to her fans. "One night during a show in Twin Falls, Idaho, my energy was all used up and I made a misstep on the tightrope. Long story short, I fell three stories and broke my fibula."

Although the tightrope incident killed Springtime's big top dreams, it opened the door to another dormant aspiration. "While my poor leg was healing I discovered an old piano in the attic of my great great grandma's second's cousin's third husband's house. I dusted it off, paid a blind man to tune it by ear and I've been playing ever since. Inside me were all these songs about all these things I've seen and all these places I've been. Just came pouring out like tears."

The result of Springtime's latent piano passions can be heard on this first release from the young songstress. Brought to you by LebensStrasse. Available all places cool discs are sold."
Kairos
Kairos
KAIROS is the solo project of Seattle multi-instrumentalist Lena Simon (La Luz). Themes of quiet melancholy are buried beneath layers of dreamy synths, geometric drums patterns and floating guitar melodies. KAIROS mixes electronic sounds with organic ones blending sweet songs with rougher edges. The live band includes local all stars Alex Barr (Kithkin, KA), Kate Finn (Katie Kate), Ray McCoy (Charms), and Conor Sisk (Brite Futures).
Venue Information:
The Crocodile
2200 2nd Ave
Seattle, WA, 98121
http://www.thecrocodile.com/